April 7, 2014
Galactic City at the Edge of the Universe
—
Astronomers discovered a massive cluster of young galaxies forming in the distant universe. The growing galactic metropolis, named COSMOS-AzTEC3, is the most distant known massive “proto-cluster” of galaxies, lying about 12.6 billion light-years away from Earth. Members of the developing cluster are shown here, circled in white, in this image taken by Japan’s Subaru telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii. The cluster was discovered by a suite of multi-wavelength telescopes, including NASA’s Spitzer, Chandra and Hubble space observatories, Subaru and the W.M. Keck Observatory, also atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
The other dots in this picture are stars or galaxies that are not members of the cluster — most of the them are located closer to us than the cluster, but some are farther away. The two brightest spots are stars. Though they appear bright in this image, they are actually tens of thousands of times fainter than what we can see with our eyes.
(via dailygalaxy)

Galactic City at the Edge of the Universe

Astronomers discovered a massive cluster of young galaxies forming in the distant universe. The growing galactic metropolis, named COSMOS-AzTEC3, is the most distant known massive “proto-cluster” of galaxies, lying about 12.6 billion light-years away from Earth. Members of the developing cluster are shown here, circled in white, in this image taken by Japan’s Subaru telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii. The cluster was discovered by a suite of multi-wavelength telescopes, including NASA’s Spitzer, Chandra and Hubble space observatories, Subaru and the W.M. Keck Observatory, also atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.

The other dots in this picture are stars or galaxies that are not members of the cluster — most of the them are located closer to us than the cluster, but some are farther away. The two brightest spots are stars. Though they appear bright in this image, they are actually tens of thousands of times fainter than what we can see with our eyes.

(via dailygalaxy)

(via 29 Life-Changing Quesadillas You Need To Know About)
This could be the greatest post ever!

(via 29 Life-Changing Quesadillas You Need To Know About)

This could be the greatest post ever!

April 6, 2014

Smashing Pumpkins - Live at the Metro (1993) [FULL CONCERT] (by FLaiR791)

Been listening/watching a lot of Nirvana lately and came across this.

April 5, 2014
Saturday…2.0

Saturday…2.0

Saturday…1.0

Saturday…1.0

suitep:

rollingstone:

Kurt Cobain died 20 years ago today. Look back at our 1994 interview with the Nirvana frontman where he opens up about about stardom, fatherhood, his feud with Pearl Jam, the death of grunge, and why he’s never been happier in his life.



Such a great interview, it really takes me back. The music scene here in Seattle was so intense during those years.

suitep:

rollingstone:

Kurt Cobain died 20 years ago today. Look back at our 1994 interview with the Nirvana frontman where he opens up about about stardom, fatherhood, his feud with Pearl Jam, the death of grunge, and why he’s never been happier in his life.

Such a great interview, it really takes me back. The music scene here in Seattle was so intense during those years.

April 4, 2014
Friday…1.0

Friday…1.0

April 3, 2014

Baby…

Cassini Spacecraft Confirms Subsurface Ocean on Enceladus
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Ever since the Cassini spacecraft first spied water vapor and ice spewing from fractures in Enceladus’ frozen surface in 2005, scientists have hypothesized that a large reservoir of water lies beneath that icy surface, possibly fueling the plumes. Now, gravity measurements gathered by Cassini have confirmed that this enticing moon of Saturn does in fact harbor a large subsurface ocean near its south pole.

“For the first time, we have used a geophysical method to determine the internal structure of Enceladus, and the data suggest that indeed there is a large, possibly regional ocean about 50 kilometers below the surface of the south pole,” says David Stevenson from Caltech, a coauthor on a paper on the finding, published in the current issue of the journal Science. “This then provides one possible story to explain why water is gushing out of these fractures we see at the south pole.”
(via universetoday)

Cassini Spacecraft Confirms Subsurface Ocean on Enceladus

Ever since the Cassini spacecraft first spied water vapor and ice spewing from fractures in Enceladus’ frozen surface in 2005, scientists have hypothesized that a large reservoir of water lies beneath that icy surface, possibly fueling the plumes. Now, gravity measurements gathered by Cassini have confirmed that this enticing moon of Saturn does in fact harbor a large subsurface ocean near its south pole.

“For the first time, we have used a geophysical method to determine the internal structure of Enceladus, and the data suggest that indeed there is a large, possibly regional ocean about 50 kilometers below the surface of the south pole,” says David Stevenson from Caltech, a coauthor on a paper on the finding, published in the current issue of the journal Science. “This then provides one possible story to explain why water is gushing out of these fractures we see at the south pole.”

(via universetoday)

April 2, 2014
Wednesday…1.0

Wednesday…1.0

nirvana (live at ‘saturday night live’ in MTV studios_ NY_ united states 10.01.1992).mp4 (by andrequinet1)

fuckyeahlost:

By revisiting LOST, can we finally see “The Man Behind The Curtain”?

The bulk of the episode—Ben’s flashback and his modern-day journey with John Locke to Jacob’s cabin—required no deep Google dives for me to reconnect instantly. Why? Because Ben’s journey isn’t really about The Purge, the cabin, or any of the other Easter eggs dropped devilishly into the mix. Rather, Ben’s journey in this episode represents the central interrogation of LOST as a whole: What belief systems do we create in order to make life bearable, and at what cost do we commit to those systems?
The show doesn’t look down on these belief systems, even though many people make many horrible choices based on those systems throughout the course of the series. But the “Live together, die alone” tenet espoused by nominal series protagonist Jack Shephard in the season-one episode “White Rabbit” isn’t just a turn of phrase—it’s an ethos is tested over and over throughout the run of the series. Every major character, Ben included, faces the terror of being alone. How each character decides to be included in some greater part of humanity informs their actions, and that’s where LOST derives most of its narrative power.

fuckyeahlost:

By revisiting LOST, can we finally see “The Man Behind The Curtain”?

The bulk of the episode—Ben’s flashback and his modern-day journey with John Locke to Jacob’s cabin—required no deep Google dives for me to reconnect instantly. Why? Because Ben’s journey isn’t really about The Purge, the cabin, or any of the other Easter eggs dropped devilishly into the mix. Rather, Ben’s journey in this episode represents the central interrogation of LOST as a whole: What belief systems do we create in order to make life bearable, and at what cost do we commit to those systems?

The show doesn’t look down on these belief systems, even though many people make many horrible choices based on those systems throughout the course of the series. But the “Live together, die alone” tenet espoused by nominal series protagonist Jack Shephard in the season-one episode “White Rabbit” isn’t just a turn of phrase—it’s an ethos is tested over and over throughout the run of the series. Every major character, Ben included, faces the terror of being alone. How each character decides to be included in some greater part of humanity informs their actions, and that’s where LOST derives most of its narrative power.

April 1, 2014
Tuesday…1.0

Tuesday…1.0

supportingactorr2d2:

Psycho (1960) - dir. Alftred Hitchcock

supportingactorr2d2:

Psycho (1960) - dir. Alftred Hitchcock

(via wilwheaton)