January 25, 2013
Curiosity’s Robotic Arm Camera Snaps 1st Night Images
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Curiosity’s high resolution robotic arm camera has just snapped the 1st set of night time images of a Martian rock of the now 5 month long mission – using illumination from ultraviolet and white light emitting LED’s. See the images above and below.
The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera is located on the tool turret at the end of Curiosity’s 7 foot (2.1 m) long robotic arm.
MAHLI took the close-up images of a rock target named “Sayunei” on Jan 22 (Sol 165), located near the front-left wheel after the rover had driven over and scuffed the area to break up rocks in an effort to try and expose fresh material, free of obscuring dust.
“Sayunei” is at the site of the “John Klein” outcrop in “Yellowknife Bay” where the team hopes to commence the 1st rock drilling operations here in the coming days. Curiosity drove a few meters several sols ago to reach “John Klein”.
(via universetoday)

Curiosity’s Robotic Arm Camera Snaps 1st Night Images

Curiosity’s high resolution robotic arm camera has just snapped the 1st set of night time images of a Martian rock of the now 5 month long mission – using illumination from ultraviolet and white light emitting LED’s. See the images above and below.

The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera is located on the tool turret at the end of Curiosity’s 7 foot (2.1 m) long robotic arm.

MAHLI took the close-up images of a rock target named “Sayunei” on Jan 22 (Sol 165), located near the front-left wheel after the rover had driven over and scuffed the area to break up rocks in an effort to try and expose fresh material, free of obscuring dust.

“Sayunei” is at the site of the “John Klein” outcrop in “Yellowknife Bay” where the team hopes to commence the 1st rock drilling operations here in the coming days. Curiosity drove a few meters several sols ago to reach “John Klein”.

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